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knowing president hamid karzai and i do i know he wouldn't agree to an afghanistan that was miles away from the sort of human rights development he wants to see progress but we have to have a hierarchy and the hierarchy of needs from the u.k.'s point of view is to focus on security and the capacity the afghan government has to secure its own country. other things have to take place behind them. >> mr. john woodcock? >> guaranteeing that this will be ordered, is that right? >> we haveade announcements about chinooks being ordered and we will stick to those announcements. >> mary mccloud. >> peace and stability in afghanistan helped by leaving an entire lting legacy and i welcome the officer -- in school. also agree with me that it is important for education for all especially young girls. >> i do agree. if you want to see a long-term stable afghanistan that canno be possible by excluding half of the population from being educated. if you look right across north africa and the middle east, permanent education of women is not just important for human-rights but also economic developm
the commander of the league war in afghanistan. lt. john allen confirmed the president's plan to withdraw troops by next september was not one of the options presented by the current commander, general david petraeus. he was joined as confirmation hearing by vice admiral william mcgraven, a member of the seal team that killed osama bin laden. and general james thurmond. this is about two hours, 25 minutes. >> good morning everybody. mccreary here to consider the three military nominations for command of some of the most >> witnesses this morning on what is truly a joint panel are general james thurmond, u.s. army nominated to be commander united nations command combined forces command that u.s. forces correa, vice admiral william mccraven as navy and nominated to be commander special operations, and lieutenant general john allen, a u.s. marine corps for rob portman to the grid of general and nominated to be commander of the nato international security assistance for u.s. forces in afghanistan. thank you all for your many years of great service to this nation and your willingness to serve once ag
of the defense department as well as the wars in iraq and afghanistan. it does not contain any money, by the way, for libya, but they could be redirected towards libya later if the defense department wanted. but there are not that many major issues. there will probably be a vote or two about afghanistan and summary directing of money. for example, we have already seen debate that would switch money from weapons or maintenance programs for medical research in the defense budget, so there are many small caliber debates that will be going on. an update on the defense spending bill from john donnelly and "congressional quarterly." heated up date on bet -- keep an update on that at cq.com. >> senate republicans and others discussed raising the federal debt ceiling. >> on tomorrow's "washington journal," a look at the ongoing negotiations of raising the federal debt ceiling howard rosen of the peterson institute for international economics after with a look at be intending free trade agreement with columbia, south korea, and panama. "washington journal" on c-span. >> this weekend on booktv on c- span2
government will withdraw 500 troops from afghanistan by the end of 2012. reducing troop levels to 9,000. following his remarks he answered questions from the opposition leader and members of the house of commons on counterterrorism efforts with pakistan, setting up officer training academies for afghan police and security operations in the region. this is an hour. >> prime minister. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with the mission i'd like to make a statement on afghanistan. from the outset this government has sought to take a more hard-headed, more security-based approach to our mission. as i said, we're not there to build a perfect democracy. still less a model society. yes, we will help with the establishment of democratic institutions. yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage development. but we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to ensure our own national security by helping the afghans to take control of theirs. this means building up the afghan security forces so we can drawdown british combat forces with the afghans themselves able to prevent al
on in afghanistan reconstruction contract. after that, harry reid announces that they said it will cancel the july 4 recess to continue budget negotiations. charles speaks of the national press club tomorrow. live coverage is here at 1:00 a.m. eastern. the last space shuttle launch is scheduled for friday july 8. >> i have huge trust in the united states of america. i have read this over and over. i have huge faith in democracy and the democratic process. >> learn more about christine lagarde. she is one of the 15,000 people you can search and watch. watch what you want when you want it. gates was presented the presidential medal of freedom today. the first defense secretary to serve as republican and democrat said at a ceremony. >> ladies and gentlemen, the vice-president of the united states. [airplane overhead] >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the official party and remain standing as honors are rendered. ladies and gentlemen, the and the host for today's tribute, barack obama. >> please be seated. ♪ ladies and gentlemen, sec. gates was awarded the honor for civilian service. and the u
.org/history. >> yesterday, a senate homeland security subcommittee on contract oversight looked at afghanistan reconstruction contracts. witnesses include contractors to receive money from the u.s. agency for international development and the army corps of engineers as well as defense department and usaid officials. missouri democratic senator clear ms. castle -- clare mccaskill chaired the two-hour hearing. if the witnesses have become -- i have a formal statement prepared but i have decided not to give a formal opening statement. and just express the reason for this hearing. this is not the first hearing we have had in the subcommittee on contract thing in our contingency operation. and i began working on this problem almost the day i wrought -- arrived in the senate. when i travel to iraq to do nothing but look at contracting oversight because i couldn't figure out how in the world things had gotten so out of control in terms of contacting in iraq. i went over to iraq and i realized why they had gotten out of control. contract and representatives were just a low man on the total bowl being
in afghanistan and pakistan. not later than 120 days after enactment of this act, the entity described in subsection 8, shall submit to the president and the congress, a report. sense of congress, it is the sense of congress that the entity should be modeled on the iraq study group. section 8127, not more than $200 million may be expended -- the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise. mr. carter: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 31 printed in the congressional record offered by mr. carter of texas. strike lines 6 through 9 relating to military musical units. the chair: the gentleman from texas is recognized for five minutes. mr. carter: i rise to address an issue i think is very important to the patriotic men and women who fight and defend our country. representative mccollum, in good graces, asked that we restrict the military band funding by $120 million and in an attempt to help with the savings. but the congressional budget office has informed us that this reduction, this $120 million re
.s. military objectives in iraq and afghanistan with the center for strategic international studies and we will talk about the debt ceiling debate and the 2012 campaign with the former chairman of the democratic national committee, tim kaine and fox news andtucker carlson. "washington♪ host: today is wednesday, july 13. we begin by talking about the continuing negotiations regarding the gatt talks happening on capitol hill -- devt talks happening on capitol hill. we will have coverage of that on c-span.org. the first 45 minutes, we want to talk about some of the items in the headlines this morning. "l.a. times," debt talks grow more desperate. senators at merger -- urgent three stage process. it would have a last choice option. for the first 45 minutes, republicans only. we want to get your thoughts on republican leadership handling the debt talks. the numbers are on the screen. if you are in the eastern and central time zone for the first. the second if you are in the mountain and pacific time zones. for the first 45 minutes, just republicans talking about the republican congressional
and a with scott miller. >> david axe was imbedded with the u.s. army in afghanistan. it is his fourth visit to the country. he spent time with the 4th airbourne, patrolling in remote areas and engaging the security situation. obama announced a plan to bring 10,000 troops home from afghanistan by the end of the year. >> it depends on where you are. my experience is in the east. i have a little experience in the south. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coaliti
on the defense spending going on for rebuilding in afghanistan. >> uh-huh. >> and there was five people on the program, and when they were asked direct and specific questions as to what's going on with the money over there, they were all saying they don't have those figures with them or possibly not qualified to answer them. and it's very insulting to sit there and listen to them, you know, telling lies to the american people. and on top of wasting that money over there, there again, wasting the money that taxpayers are paying politicians to sit and have to listen to these lies and they sweep stuff under the table. and saying we will get back to you when people are watching this program. they are not able to get the answers they are waiting to see and they never even hear the answers for six months or a year down the road. it will be a great way to start. it makes you wonder if they need to be on a lie detector sodium penathol lalan on our democrats line caller: good morning. >> you are on. go ahead. caller: okay. it amazes me how we can keep this issue about cutting spending, where i
and reconstruction in afghanistan. the great majority of which has been channeled through private contractors. we know from experience in bosnia in the 1990's and more recently in iraq that a reduction in troop levels as not mean a drop in contractor activity. in some cases, it is a matter of increase. there has been increase reliance on contractors to fulfill the logistical roles once performed by the military in those instances. eventually, the contractor presence will also decrease as we move support of large-scale off-budget scanned it -- spending to more direct to the afghan government directly. this is why our reconstruction strategy must focus on insuring that afghans can sustain what we have helped build. how many additional schools and health, as we can construct, but also that there are teachers and health care officials to sustain those institutions. whether afghans have the resources and expertise to manage the long-term operation and maintenance of power plants. on a related note, as we encourage more contracting with local afghan firms under the afghan first policy, we must consider
of afghanistan, its abilities to reestablish the safe haven. in other words, we in to render the heart of al qaeda and capable of launching attacks on our homeland, citizens, our allies, as well as preventing this group and its affiliates and adherents from doing so. at the same time, hopefully a kid and means to address the serious threat posed by the -- this does not require a global war. it does require a focus on specific regions, including what we might call the periphery, places like yemen, somalia, iraq -- it is another important distinguishing factor. it has looked increasingly to other groups and individuals to take a because, including the gold strike and the united states. we a specific and focus counter- terrorism and objectives. we're protecting our home and by constantly reducing our vulnerability is and not acting -- and adapting our abilities. we're the greatest al qaeda's capabilities and disrupting its operation. we're degrading the capability of al qaeda senior leadership to inspire, to nicki with, and direct the operations of its adherents from the world. we are aggressiv
of taxpayer funds is being properly spent given where we are in afghanistan and is all the more important. let's go to this specific project, a free could, that you discussed with the chair. the 64-mile highway, it will reach $776 million. the cost overruns have not exceeded 100%. i do not know if that is accurate or not. that is the way i read the numbers. in your testimony, you attributing this to the security environment. you responded to this shares questions about the security environment. what is the cost overrun excluding security costs. >> let me clarify it in little bit. that was our estimate we thought at the time it would cost to build that road. the bids that came in and the firm that won the contract came in at $85 million to $86 million. that was the starting point for us of the construction, not counting security for the construction management. from our perspective, the construction starting point is about $85 million to $86 million. when you include security and the construction management, if it was about $107 million. the $85 million to $86 million bid by the construction fi
actxs reports on u.s. troops in southern afghanistan. then, representative thaddeus mccotter announces his candidacy for president. >> tune in to c-span this independent state. panelists discuss if the united states can remain united. >> at the political level, we are more divided. you look at partisan polarization at any point since the civil war and reconstruction. >> then, religion, bonds, and the death penalty. later, nixon white house insiders discuss his foreign policy. this monday on c-span. for the complete schedule, go to c-span.org. >> david axe was imbedded with the u.s. army in afghanistan. it is his fourth visit to the country. he spent time with the 4th airbourne, patrolling in remote areas and engaging the security situation. obama announced a plan to bring 10,000 troops home from afghanistan by the end of the year. >> it depends on where you are. my experience is in the east. i have a little experience in the south. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have st
.s. policy in afghanistan and iraq. we want to begin the segment by talking with the defense policy reporter with bloomberg news. she joins us by phone. she has traveled with defense and that i ton patte iraq. talk about what you heard the defense secretary do while he was overseas. guest: it was interesting to watch secretary panetta and compare how he handled the trip and his interaction with troops and with foreign leaders to secretary gates. he has fairly big shoes to f ill, according to people who were quite complementary. leon panetta also has a lot of familiarity with u.s. military forces. forces. with the commanders and foreign leaders that he is meeting with and going to be interacting with. with his experience as cia director for more than two years before taking this job and in other capacities, for example, a member of iraq study group that did the independent assessment in 2006 of the war in iraq. host: was specifically was the defense secretary trying to accomplish on this trip? guest: he wanted to go out and touch base with the troops themselves and make that connection. it is
them to show documents about them acting in afghanistan or iraq. we are going around and around. >> i think the records are well- chronicled. they lose document, they are unresponsive. they have a false negative credit reporting. all of it is going on, and it is terrible for the people. it is more terrible when they do it to our service people overseas. can you put this up? he was deployed to iraq as a the tenant in 2009-2010. his bank told his wife that she could pay using money orders. chase failed to process the payments. and they submitted inaccurate reports to the credit bureaus, which badly impacted his security clearance while he was still deployed. the military tried to help him. she described her uphill battle. she said, to be honest, i have not been able to do anything with this client. customer service refuses to talk to me without a letter of authorization. i have sent it four separate times to different facts numbers. i have left a voice messages with tebet supervisors and no one calls me back. i need to talk to a human being that will listen to the facts of the case and
the civil war in afghanistan. i do not understand why members of congress want to spend $10 billion a month in afghanistan when our people back home are struggling. i can assure you the american people do not understand it, either. in june, a poll was conducted by the pew research center where 56% of the american people polled said bring our troops home now. not later. mr. speaker, i brought back the picture of edy and stephanie. their father and lieutenant colonel palmer, died, and that continues to haunt me. and the way they died continues to haunt me. that's the reason i wanted to bring this picture down here again. they were given the task to train afghans to be policemen. the two were shot and murdered by one of the trainees. what really haunts me is the email sergeant baldwin sent to his wife the day before he was shot and killed. i quote the email, i don't trust them. i don't trust them. for anything. not for anything at all. why in the world do we continue to send our young men and women overseas to get theirselves blown up, shot, and murdered by people they are trying to train? the
and afghanistan. and my belief that there is a smarter way to achieve our national security goals. and so, madam speaker, since that day i stood here in this spot to say over and over again that these wars are eroding our spiritual core. bankrupting us morally and fiscally. teaching our children that warfare is the new normal. i have delivered these speeches as a member of the majority and the minority when the president was a member of my party and when he was not, and today i am doing it for the 400th time. when i began the war in iraq was still quite popular. as was the president who launched it. but we spoke out anyway, refusing to bend on principle because we knew that we did not belong there. my colleagues, representative barbara lee and representative maxine waters and i, we called ourselves the triad, started the out of iraq caucus. we first -- forced the first house vote to bring our troops home. along the way i visited iraq, i tried and i learned on that trip and my opinion was confirmed against that very war, but at the same time it increased my admiration for our troops. gradually th
of afghanistan. he sat down to interview capt. there. at the end of the interview, he realized that capt. in that isolated outpost in afghanistan, because of this hyper connectivity had access to more intelligence and more firepower than martin dempsey did when he took baghdad from saddam hussein. that has driven his whole education of the army system. at the camp, they give every new recouped and iphone and you download the application and teach the class. when you have a commander in the outpost of afghanistan with more power -- more firepower and access to intelligence than you did when he commanded the troops who took baghdad, that commander has to be trained to invent, reinvent, and adapt so much more than anyone can -- anyone 10, 15, 20 years ago. that's happening throughout the labor market. what does it mean for education? >> it means we have to educational challenges today. we need more education in better education. buy more education, and this is a challenge all of the face, we need to bring the bottom up to our average and we need to do it really fast. at the same time, we ne
was visiting an outpost in the far reaches of afghanistan. he sat down to interview capt. there. at the end of the interview, he realized that capt. in that isolated outpost in afghanistan, because of this hyper connectivity had access to more intelligence and more firepower than martin dempsey did when he took baghdad from saddam hussein. that has driven his whole education of the army system. at the camp, they give every new recouped and iphone and you download the application and teach the class. when you have a commander in the outpost of afghanistan with more power -- more firepower and access to intelligence than you did when he commanded the troops who took baghdad, that commander has to be trained to invent, reinvent, and adapt so much more than anyone can -- anyone 10, 15, 20 years ago. that's happening throughout the labor market. what does it mean for education? >> it means we have to educational challenges today. we need more education in better education. buy more education, and this is a challenge all of the face, we need to bring the bottom up to our average and we need to do
rodriguez says he doesn't expect violence in afghanistan to start decreasing until next year. from the pentagon earlier today, this is 45 minutes. >> general rodriguez, it's counselor dave lapin at the pentagon. if you're ready to go, i'll introduce you and we'll get started. >> ok, dave, go ahead, thanks. >> thank you. good morning to those here, good evening in afghanistan. i'd like to welcome pack to the pentagon briefing room, army lieutenant general david rodriguez. he's commander of the international security assistance force joint command, also known as i.j.c. and also the deputy commander of the united states forces afghanistan. general rodriguez's current tour began in june, 2009, he became the first commander of the i.j.c. in october of that year. prior to that, general rodriguez was commander of regional command east for 15 months from january, 2007 to april, 2008. next week after two straight years in command and more than 40 months in after gap stan over the past 4 1/2 year, general rodriguez is ski wruled to change command and return stateside to have u.s. army forces
in afghanistan. fourthly, a plan of a special envoy -- appointment of a special envoy. when you make these recommendations, are you saying we're not curly undertaking any of them or do you see some of them as an expansion of what we are doing? or as i was in before, more of a focused approach? >> sir, i served in iraq and afghanistan. you see again and again, usaid, the state department, having difficulties. it when i started working on yemen, it is a familiar situation to me, although, it is not iraq and afghanistan. it is focused on working with local partners that may or may not work in the areas we are mostly concerned with. it is overly centralized, very focused on process and sort of the factions that in the national capital. i cannot take with the political opposition is. that is the political opposition we need to be worried about. but we do not have a good understanding of the human terrain. and iraq, could almost happen by accident. -- it on this happen by accident. i think most of our human terrain is probably focused on the counter-terrorism mission. it is not about the h
military engagements in iraq, afghanistan, and now libya. i speak of the need also of a new smart security to keep america safe. today will be my 399th speech. i look forward to reaching number 400 next week, and i will continue this until my last day as a member of congress, which gives me approximately 18 months, 1 1/2 years, time to bring our troops safely home. during this week, the week that the house is debating the appropriations, i thought it would be fitting to focus on more spending, on the staggering costs that taxpayers are being asked to bear for our military occupation. $10 billion a month is a lot of money, and that's the price tag for the privilege of continuing to wage a 10-year war against afghanistan. $10 billion a month. the american people who are writing that check have a right to ask and to get answers to some very important questions. where is that money going and what exactly is it accomplishing? what are we getting for our $10 billion a month? are we more secure here at home? is the afghanistan central government introducing the rule of law? have we not already de
to debate the timing of our military drawdown in afghanistan. my belief is that the general's voice should carry the most weight. what is wrong as for the republican party to shrink from the challenges of american leadership in the world. history repeatedly warns us that in the long run, weakest and foreign policy cost us and our children much more than we will ever say in the budget -- saved in the budget line item. america has one political party devoted to decline and withdrawal it doesn't need a second one. our enemies respect and respond to strength. sometimes strength means military intervention. sometimes it means diplomatic pressure. that always means moral clarity in word and deed. that is the legacy of republican foreign policy at its best in our next republican president must carry the banner around the world. of equality and opportunity for all citizens, it remains a dream for people in the middle east and around the world. as america stands for these principles and stands with our friends and allies, the middle east will transform this moment of turbulence into a more lasting
about afghanistan and what it calls men and women to serve and what they do so. let's look at this story. the deficit battle is favoring the gop. we will see house some of this plays out this week. : is thetion today is constitution still relevant? now to the democratic line with lawrence from new jersey. welcome. caller: thanks for taking my call. >> is the constitution still relevant? i don't think it does. most americans don't know anything about the treaty of kent. it says to return things to the way they were before. we established the federal government, the irs, and federal income-tax. anniversary ofe 2 the signing of this treaty. rights will be taken away. host: here's a comment from twitter. here's another comment on twitter. let's take a look at some final numbers. this is from culpeper, virginia. thanks for all your calls this morning. we will be back in a few moments talking about topics ranging from white people serve in the military to what americans think about patriotism. we will be right back. >> ♪ >> today on c-span, the dalai lama and vincent harding talk about non-v
have expanded radically with involvement in afghanistan and iraq. as we will hear, the u.s. as crated a police force in iraq that may number as many as 400,000 personnel. the goal of the u.s.-led nato training effort is at 157,000 police and the cost of this training program to the u.s. alone is about $1 billion per month. today, police assistance programs in the government are in multibillion-dollar effort led by the departments of defense and the department state but involving a number of other federal agencies. as programs have grown in size and cost, they also grow in kind. as you saw from the exhibition here on the screen, policing around the world is heavily impacted by history, culture, legal systems, and level of development. police forces differ markedly, so do they differ by agency and the country in which they work in. today, we have assembled a panel of very distinguished experts to discuss the various approaches that the u.s. government takes towards police training in foreign countries. you have the bad reviews for our speakers, so i will not do that. the speakers will c
, debt ceiling negotiations, education, and the situation in afghanistan. a poll thursday shows from the leading the state republican primary among likely voters, with 29% of the vote. rep michele bachman is at 12%. new hampshire hosts the first presidential primary in 2012. this program runs about 25 minutes. >> the new hampshire institute of politics, with financial support from the aarp new hampshire, presents this special -- conversation with the candidates. tonight, governor mitt romney. >> good evening, and welcome to conversation with the candidate. our guest this evening is former massachusetts governor mix from a. -- mitt romney. we will get to know where he stands on the key issues. we will start with questions from me, but after the break, we will bring questions from the studio audience in a town hall format. let us get a quick look at the candidate's biography. he chose this form, rich in beauty and political history, as the spot to make his second run for the white house official. >> i believe in america, and i am running for president. >> met romney was going in detroi
troops home from afghanistan. i do that because i have the privilege to represent the third district of north carolina, the home of camp lejeune marine base, cherry point and seymour johnson air force base. i have been privileged since i didn't serve to have great relationships with active duty and retired marines in the district, and i want to share with this house, mr. speaker, that we continue to support a corrupt leader and a corrupt government. just recently, the half brother of mr. karzai, half brother named wali karzai, was murdered in afghanistan. this only reinforces the fact that afghanistan is in a fragile situation at every level of their government. it is in chaos, quite frankly. just this week i spoke with a marine colonel who's been to afghanistan three times. he was in my office on tuesday, and he shared the same sentiments as the retired marine general who has been advising me for 20 months, and recently i emailed the general and said, please give me your ideas of what mr. obama has proposed in bringing 10,000 of our troops out in july and then another 23,000 in -- n
and not put them on the backs of our seniors. the wars in iraq and afghanistan, the president has already begun a drawdown a it could be significant so we save in the long run. making certain that people are back to work so they are contributing to our tax base in a way that we need. and we know that we have to raise revenue. we must race revenue. our seniors understand that. but what we cannot do is shift the burden for these things that were not caused by seniors onto the backs of our seniors by pushing them into really unfair cuts to their medicare and social security benefits. . mr. tonko: i'm going to do a bit of close and then ask each of the representatives that remain here on the floor, we were joined earlier by representative chu from california, to offer your sentiments and then we'll bring the hour to a close. but you know, what i think is very important to note is that if we can find ways to save on medicare we should invest that in medicare to strengthen medicare. if we can find ways to save in social security, reinvest in social security. they deserve to be stand alones beca
trillion of cuts savings from leaving afghanistan and iraq is just not credible. we don't know what the obstacles are going to be in afghanistan and possibly iraq. we also don't know what we might have to do in the middle east going forward. afghanistan is not settled, mr. president, and we have to have a certain level of stability on the ground in afghanistan or we will have wasted the billions that we have already spent and the lives of our military personnel in afghanistan because it will go back to the way it was before, a center for terrorism that will comeo our country or can come to our country. it did once already and we have been over there to try to wipe out al qaeda and the taliban, which has been in league with al qaeda. we have been over there losing american lives and spending american taxpayer dollars to protect our country from another 9/11. to say that we're going to c $1 trillion in the future over the next ten years when we aren't placing the emphasis on what are the conditions on the ground is not sound policy and it's certainly not sound national security policy
now. everybody wants to talk about the wars in iraq and afghanistan. george afghanistan. george bush left office, he left a deficit of under $1 trillion. that is an obama stimulus package for one year and that was enough to hold us in iraq and afghanistan for seven years. host: let's go to a democratic caller in brooklyn, new york. caller in brooklyn, new york. caller: i think the numbers of the other caller are totally false. obama should keep his footing in this situation. the republicans say they will walk away and limit the amount of money but they will talk about that is on the table is preposterous. it is showing that they are scared and they are finally realizing that obama has an understanding of the economy and he has an understanding and backing of the people. right now is the time to change the way we need to move forward in terms of fiscal responsibility and in terms of paying our bills. with john boehner trying to figure out which way his caucus will both and which -- vote, he will lose his job and we will not be able to rectify the things that are wrong with the economy
savings from winding down the wars in iraq and afghanistan. these are real savings that cbo scores at about $1 trillion. we know that some republicans will quibble over these savings but they have no leg to stand on. but wars are the second biggest policy driver of our deficits after the bush tax cut for the conduct and the worst ads to our debt, to is undeniable that winding down the war's delivers savings. the administration tells us with the wind down, they can't prosecute -- they can count on billions of dollars over the next decade the cbo count $1.67 trillion. we know the republicans agree theythis mstath because included the same settings in the ryan budget that passed the house. they never criticized that accounting and it is hard to see how they could do so now. lastly, senator reid's proposal allows for a joint committee that has the potential to achieve deeper savings down the road. all in all, this is an offer that republicans cannot refuse. all of the cuts in center repots proposal have been supported at one point or another by republicans. if they refuse this offer, i
to afghanistan. we were out of the taliban out of power. karzai stood for free elections in 2004. al qaeda was dismantled and settled in waziristan and pakistan. this is not a nation-building exercise. this encounter terror exercise. we do not need 100,000 troops on the ground at the cost we are paying today in order to get the job done. [applause] and i am here to tell you that the future of the u.s. is not going to be determined in the prairies of afghanistan. the future of the u.s., whether you want to recognize it or not, is going to be determined by how well prepared we are to compete in a highly competitive century, and that battle is going to be waged across the ocean. as you walk off of this building, i want you to remember why we are in this race. it is about the generation behind us and the condition they will find our nation in. the debt trajectory that we are on. and number two, the reality of launching a new industrial revolution, it is within our grasp. it has happened before in our nation's history. problem-solving people can do it again. we need leadership and a game plan.
it comes to discussing the merits of continuing our efforts in afghanistan, the republicans clamor to defend it despite our fiscal mess. i want to remind my republican friends the situation we are in now is not new. throughout history from rome to the ottoman empire to the soviet union the over extension of military and protracted struggles in foreign countries has crippled empires. some historians have credited ronald reagan for the soviet union's collapse but what really bankrupted the soviet union was its wars, just like us, they paid a crushing price both financially and morally in afghanistan. overextending geopolitically comes at a cost over time in any nation that thinks otherwise is setting itself up to repeat the mistakes of the past. as of today, the united states has spent more than 2 1/2 times the percentage of g.d.p. on afghanistan that the -- than the soviet union spent on its g.d.p. during its nine-year war in afghanistan. public polls are clear, americans know the cost of the war in afghanistan is unsustainable and want us to withdraw as soon as possible. when it co
airborne division which is located along the afghanistan border with pakistan. then a discussion about the 2012 presidential campaign with a focus on the grounds an early primary states as well as the republican presidential field. >> today, the dalai lama and vincent harding talk about non violence. they spoke to more than 10,000 people at the university of arkansas discussing osama bin laden's death, the nuremberg trials, the execution of saddam hussein, and the death penalty. >> in the 20th-century, the number of people were killed and three violence, over 200 million. that problem must be solved. there is also exploitation and we should lay down the seat of hatred course watched this discussion this evening at 6:30 on c-span. what's it look back at president nixon's foreign-policy. members of his administration and his son-in-law discussed topics including communism in china, invading north vietnam and the war in the middle east. >> the discussion in the newspapers were nixon's secret plan for peace. rockefeller did not think that nixon had a plan. he comes in after a hard day camp
university professor. after this break, we will talk more politics and legislation and afghanistan with our roundtable, conn carroll and jamelle bouie. be right back. ♪ >> monday on c-span, the dali lama -- dalai lama and martin luther king, jr.'s speechwriter. they spoke about a number of topics, including the death penalty. >> the number of people who kill through violence -- are killed through violence, over 200 million. but problem not solved. i think that people lay down a seed of hatred. >> watch this discussion monday at 6:30 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> monday night on c-span, look back at president nixon's foreign policy. members of his administration and the president's son-in-law discuss topics including communism in china, invading north vietnam, and the 1967 war in the middle east. >> the discussion then in the newspapers were nixon's secret plan for peace. what was it? of course, he never talked about it. that was rockefeller pushing nixon to say something, to expose what his plan was. rockefeller did not think that nixon had a plan. he comes in after a hard day of campaigning
away from capitol hill, the economy and debt crisis are weighing heavily on u.s. troops in afghanistan. the top question on their minds saturday, even as bombings rocked the city around them, was the top u.s. military officer couldn't answer. will we get paid? these are soldiers in afghanistan with the bombs bursting around them. here's what the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said, and i quote, "i honestly don't know the answer to that question." admiral mike mcmullin responded, statement telling them to work each day to defend this country. wearing the uniform, listening to bombs go off around them. that is why today what is referred to in the press as real people. i guess we're not. we have students like laura and sidney. we have veterans like bill and roger and carlos and ariana who is a senior. guerm who is a senior. felicia is a senior. alyssa is a senior. they are here representing the millions of people around this country who are as frayed of the soldiers on the frontline in afghanistan. we don't have more delaying tactics? we need to get to the business of hand. we have
're at war for 10 years, in afghanistan and iraq at surge levels. we assume we're going to be fighting this war for 10 more years, with over 100,000 troops in afghanistan and oh, gosh, wait, we're going to withdraw our troops in 2014. $1 trillion in savings. i've got a better idea. let's pass a bill to cover the moon with yogurt that will cost $5 trillion today. and then let's pass a bill the next day to cancel that bill. we could save $5 trillion. wait, i've got a better idea. our debt is $14 trillion. let's come up with a new plan to spend $14 trillion, then rescind it the next day and let's save $14 trillion. this stuff is fiscal fantasy. you can't make this stuff up, mr. speaker. suggesting that we're going to be in a war at these levels for 10 more years when everybody knows we've already decided not to do that, that does not get us $1.3 trillion in spending cuts. only in washington can you add up math like that. we need real spending cuts. i yield myself an additional minute to say, this is getting serious,r. speaker. very serious. we can't keep spendg money we just don't have. 4
security adviser tom brennan unveiling a new counterterrorism strategy and afghanistan. >> shogash had decided several days before mckinley arrive that he was going to kill him. he had gone out and bought a pistol and the fall of mckinley's whereabouts in the newspapers which were reported in great detail. he began tracking him throughout the fair. >> on december 6, 1901, two fatal shots were fired at president mckinley. tonight, scott miller looks at the president and his assassin and the changing era in which they lived on cspan's "q7a." >> welcome to news "makers." our guest this week is kentucky senator rand paul joining us from capitol hill. >> good to be with you. >> our reporters are major garrett. >> do you believe the august 2 deadline this doubles by secretary of the treasury tim geithner is a real deadline? if you were to describe your -- to your constituents and condin kentucky what the consequences would be if we did not reach the debt ceiling? >> ultimately, if a country's keeps spending more than it takes in, about the deadline, it has been moved three or four months and
to be liked rather than respected. they have wound up being need that. >> the war in iraq and afghanistan, what would you do? >> help the iraqi security forces to govern that country. in afghanistan, we have to walk -- have to watch out for a precipitous withdrawal. it would create a new harbor for terrorism and they would lose their ability to stabilize the government. >> have you met world leaders? what has been your impression of them? >> i do not believe that is important. i look at the strategic interest of the united states and our allies and how we can mutually cooperate and mutually conflicts. >> finish this sentence. the state of the country today is what? >> an opportunity to be seized. big government and big banks have failed us. the crushing weight of the potential markets have yet to be fixed. that has helped to inhibit the ability of the american people to move forward. it is never a failure of the american people. that is not why we are having the difficulties we are having. it is the failure of governments to affect the larger institutions. for a period of time, you are ab
at the borders, ports, afghanistan, iraq, police, and our departments by harnessing that american spirit so that we can become a more resilient nation. we are going to be dealing with this sort of threat for the perceivable future, for a couple of generations. you have summed it up very well. we need to confront the risk and overcome it. the executive committee in committee leaders will need to establish overarching policy for the national governors association. following that meeting, the committee will begin work to consolidate, revise, and align our policies for the priorities set by the executive committee. it is our hope that we will be but to build a consensus around key principles, like resilience, that can guide our advocacy efforts and better inform not only our federal lawmakers of the issues but do a better job of informing our citizens of the things that we can do as a free people to make our homeland more secure. the executive committee, we have agreed to allow all policies up for consideration for new policies and process, whatever that means, and we will discuss it at that ti
of honorable and distinguished service, but the fact remains that the fundamental realities in afghanistan haven't changed. "the new york times" put it plainly, noting that the general is, and i quote them, "the general is leaving behind a country racked by deep political instability whose fledging security forces are fighting a weakened but deadly insurgency that kills coalition troops and afghan civilians and officials nearly every day." that's a pretty damning assessment, mr. speaker, and it's accurate. in recent weeks two of president karzai's most powerful allies, including his brother, have been gunned down by the taliban. and ordinary afghan citizens are caught in the line of fire as never, never before. the u.n. recently reported that more afghan civilians were killed in the first half of 2011 than in any other six-month period since the war began. some these casualties are the accidental result of errant attacks and night raids by u.s. and nato forces. but the overwhelming majority of civilian deaths came at the hands of insurgents often using suicide bombers. there were nearly 1,
want to get you caught up in another headline coming out of afghanistan. the president's brother, half- brother, shot dead by bodyguards. joining us on the phone is hei di with the associated press. what happened? guest: this man was a close associate of the president's brother. he was in ahmad wali karzai's house and shot him at least twice before he himself was gunned down. host: was it his own bodyguard? who was this person? caller: we are still gathering details on who this man was. it's clear he was a very close, personal friend. he does handle security for ahmad wali karzai. it sounds like he is a much higher level than your personal bodyguard would be. in theaallowed a gun home, which shows the trust between the two men. brother awas karzai's target? very powerful figure in southern afghanistan and a very controversial one. he's the head of the provincial council, which on its own would make him the man controlling the area. both because of his connections to the president and a lot of associations -- he made things happen in kandahar province, which is the real former stronghol
and afghanistan, then i would be absolutely against that. host: one more headline and then we will move on to the debt talks. "administration offers health care cuts as part of budget negotiations." this is from "the new york times" on tuesday. guest: what the president is trying to get a very recalcitrant bunch of politicians to come to the table and negotiate. he has tried many ways to get republican colleagues to come to some middle ground and has not succeeded and i suspect he is saying, look, i will put everything on the table and let us see what sticks. i suspect that is what he is doing. otherwise we just save about half a trillion dollars in medicare the next -- years through the historic health reform. how you are going to take more out without really hurting seniors, i don't know. host: steny hoyer, your democratic whip, said he was willing to work with the republicans to reduce the debt. what did that mean to you and how willing are you? guest: i think with -- what mr. steny hoyer is saying is most democrats have put things on the table, some very painful things. and i believ
to be done, what we're going to keep and what cut. i would like to see all the troops that are in afghanistan and iraq come home. we simply cannot afford it as a nation. host: let's go to comments made by jay carney yesterday at the white house, press secretary if talking about cut, cap, and balance proposal by republicans, and why he thinks it's worse than the ryan budget plan. >> it requires the passage of a balanced budget amendment and all this would require the even more draconian cuts than the ones that were in the right and budget. a cut in cleana 1 energy and a significant dismantling of social security plans and medicaid. congressman ryan's plan did not deal with social security, but the draconian savings that are called for in this measure, you have to do that to these programs. we don't need these kinds of measures. what we need is congress to get to work to agree to compromise, to agree to do the work of the american people instead of satisfying a narrow slice of the political spectrum. host: white house press secretary jay carney speaking yesterday. today c-span's facebook page w
on fuel and provide more enticing amenities to passengers. from afghanistan, the taliban says that their leader is alive and that a text message an internet posting announcing -- end internet posting announcing his death are fake. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> is weakened on "booktv," on c-span -- and this weekend on "booktv," on c-span2. on afterwards -- "after words," ben mezrich. look for the complete schedule at booktv.org. sign up for our e-mail alerts to get the schedule in your in box. -- inbox. >> "the supreme court" -- the new edition includes an interview with the newest supreme court justice, elena kagen, and you can add -- elena kagan. and you can add to your experience with -- "washington journal" continues. host: as we continue our precision about the debt ceiling and other related issues, we're pleased -- are, were stationed about the debt ceiling and other related issues, we're pleased to be joined by the chief deputy whip on the house side, peter welch. tell us why you voted against cut, cap, and balance ac yest today in the house
spending in iraq and -- of spending in iraq and afghanistan. how about that? we will spend more than $833 million in the next three days in kabul and baghdad. in part to help build clean water systems there. in part to help create jobs there. i just think that's inexcusable that we find ourselves in a position where we're spending in two or three days in iraq and afghanistan when we could spend to eliminate this cut and provide clean drinking water for the people of our country. the amount of subsidies we're going to give oil companies. the oil companies made record profits in 2010. they made about $60 billion in profits, if i'm not mistaken. $77 billion, actually, in profits last year. we'll spend six times as much of this cut in the clean drinking water fund to give money away to those oil companies this year. these are people who made $77 billion in profits last year, whose stocks are off the charts, who are paying their c.e.o.'s hundreds of millions of dollars in compensation, and we're going to give them about $7 billion from the wallets of the people of this country this year. that'
and afghanistan, and at the time that we have gone to war, that is what we did the bush tax cuts, the corporate tax cuts that further douglas into the economic hole that we are in. it is -- that further doug us into the economical that we are in. it is the first time in history. host: here is a tweet. guest: those are the priorities that are laid before congress. we have a hearing yesterday where we did a land exchange. republicans passed a totally partisan votes. copper orr in the state of arizona will be taken out, no royalties paid for by a foreign company. it will be shipped to china for their industry that is growing. but no royalties, nothing bad for the american taxpayer. yet we wonder how we got ourselves into the situation we arwin. host: just announced, unemployment applications fall for a second week, few more -- fewer people sought unemployment benefits. the labor department says weekly applications dropped 22,000 to a seasonally adjusted 405,000, the lowest level in almost three months. was the employment situation in your district? guest: unfortunately, yuma county leads the natio
a reason why we are in iraq and libya and afghanistan. but having said that, let's face it, it would be ridiculous to assume that i'm making an appeal for democrats when what i'm talking about is those people who are vulnerable. because of our financial center cause people to lose their homes, it wasn't just democrats, there were democrats, republicans, independents, and those that have no faith in government that woke up in the morning, they lost their jobs, they lost their home, they lost their pension funds, they lost their savings, they had to pull their kids out of school, they lost their self-esteem, some lost their homes. i don't remember anywelfare reform we are talking about people that are registered democrats. these are americans that are expected -- that expected more from their government than just saying that we will be able to address your deeds in the by and by. and the very people that are aged, god knows we are not talking about a party label. we are talking about our sick or we are talking about medicaid, we are talking about medicare, when we talk about social sec
against it from the beginning? >> yes. >> ok, let's go to afghanistan. >> afghanistan, i think it made sense after 9/11 to hunt down bin laden. he was clearly there, the taliban refused to cough him up. i think it made sense to invade. it does not make sense to be there now a decade later, or more, with not even a clear withdrawal plan. >> what's your take on marijuana? >> marijuana is -- should be legal and it -- it should be as legal and acceptable as booze. >> abortion laws. >> abortion laws, i'm in favor of a woman's right to choose and i think that whenever your take on abortion, and i'd say maybe 30 percent of libertarians are very, very anti-abortion, because they believe that the fetus, at least, at a certain point deserves the rights that everybody else has. government funding should not be involved in abortion but more to the point, we are at the very early stages of actually controlling our bodies, our biology, our reproduction. i think abortion is becoming less and less important to public discourse and will continue to, as we develop more control over how -- how and under
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